Rainbows!

You know you’re concerned with gender issues when a rainbow automatically makes you think of LGBT rights.

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Bicycles for guys are weird

What are some of the characteristics one looks for in a bike? Functionality and ease of use would be two of my priorities. So I have to admit that I cannot for the life of me understand why the typical bicycle model for men has this awkward bar situated horizontally high up on the frame. It really makes mounting and descending much more difficult. And it can cause some serious harm and injuries in sensitive places. Why are they constructed that way? I find it hard to see the logic. Unless they were invented as some early form for birth control method?

A typical bike for women

A typical bike for ladies

A typical bike for guys

A typical bike for guys

The power of colours

From the second we are born, the process of shaping us as women and men begins.

Norwegian children's books. The pink is for "tough girls", and the blue for "tough boys".

Norwegian children’s books. The pink is for “tough girls”, and the blue for “tough boys”.

(Yes, there are many theories about what is nature and what is nurture, but the fact is that there is no society today which is gender neutral. Hence, we do not know to what extent we could have been gender neutral if there were no norms about how girls and boys should behave.)

Girls are wrapped in pink blankets, and boys in blue. But it was not always like that, as The Forgotten History Blog describes. However, today, pink is considered to be feminine, cute, dainty, and is related to characteristics which “good girls” are taught: obedience, gentleness, sensitivity to emotions, considerations for others, non-selfishness, etc. However, girls and women can use blue without being mocked.

Boys, on the other hand, are taught to be tough, strong, and society accept that they are rowdy, loud, careless, and somewhat egoistic. Boys are told not to “be a girl”, to “man up”, and to “not be a mama’s boy”. Very few boys or men use pink, as femininity in men as a rule is frowned upon.

Aren’t both stereotypes just as limiting for any child’s development, and can’t they alienate individuals with other characteristics and traits than those encouraged for their particular sex? I believe so.